August Marketing & advertising

This month we take a look at the top stories from the worlds of marketing and advertising, including the Rio Olympics and Snapchat’s new user data sharing policy.

Olympics 2016 proves there are winners and losers in marketing too

The 2016 Rio Olympics are over, but the marketing revelations keep on coming. The latest Brand Agility Index study by PR firm Waggener Edstrom Communications revealed the biggest marketing winners of the Olympic sponsors, and the podium has some surprising additions. Samsung and Nissan both earned golds for their performances, while long-time sponsors Visa and McDonald’s both failed to live up to expectations. Both Nissan and Samsung were boosted by the record medal haul enjoyed by team GB, who finished second behind the US. With a series of ads starring comedian Jack Whitehall, Samsung walked a fine line between comedy and drama. Likewise, Nissan took a tongue in cheek approach to the Games with a series of ads in which ‘Nissan executives’ gave team GB athletes a range of bizarre product placement requests. The car company covered every base with their campaign, including harnessing the power of the Games’ appeal through social media coverage and allowing fans to ‘train alongside team GB athletes’ via Facebook Live. With its Olympics hashtag #QuemSeAtreve (#WhoDares) being named third best-performing hashtag of the Games, Nissan outperformed global sponsors and enjoyed a full percentage point increase in their Brazil market share.

August Marketing & Advertising

Twitter signs up Warner Bros for UK ‘promoted stickers’ launch

In anticipation of the latest JK Rowling film Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Warner Brothers has teamed up with Twitter to introduce promoted stickers. The campaign will span across the UK, US, Japan, Brazil, France and Spain. The campaign allows brands to design four or eight stickers, which users can then add to their photographs as a form of “visual hashtag.” Photos featuring the brand’s stickers can be found by anyone who taps the sticker, including brands who want to see exactly who are engaging with their brand.

This isn’t the first time the sticker hashtag tool has been used in marketing, although it could be the most innovative use of it yet. Pepsi introduced the concept of visual hashtags in the US earlier this year, with the #PepsiMoji campaign encouraging users to take pics of custom emojis on its products’ packaging. As brands look to new ways to combine the digital and the physical worlds, we can expect a lot more in the way of cross-media, inter-brand collaboration.

August marketing & advertising

Snapchat enables advertisers to access personal user data

In an effort to increase its advertising revenue, Snapchat has pledged to allow advertisers access to personal user data. The move will allow advertisers to provide the most personalised marketing experience to the user since Snapchat first introduced ads back in 2014.  

Of course, the “sophisticated behavioural targeting tool,” as it is referred to, has raised yet more questions about the nature of privacy in social media. The company’s CEO, Evan Spiegel, had even called user tracking for the sake of tailored advertising “creepy,” but it looks like Snapchat has since come round to the idea. Some have called out the user tracking as an invasive measure, despite that the platform will not capture data from your browsing history outside the app. Snapchat addressed the issue, saying “We want you to feel understood. We want to understand what’s relevant to you and your life, and we want to show you things that you’ll care about.” Let us know in the comments what you think of Snapchat’s new personal data policy.

August Marketing & Advertising

Personalisation most important email attribute for click-through

Confirming what most marketers already suspected, this month saw a UK-based survey reveal personalisation as the attribute most likely to prompt click-through in an email marketing campaign. Conducted by French online marketing consultancy firm Mailjet, the survey asked a diverse pool of UK-internet users to point out the top five marketing email features most likely to get them clicking through to a branded page.

The survey found that personalisation took precedent as the most important overall factor, with 40.2% citing it as the most important element for a click-through. The study also threw up some unexpected findings, including that 40% of millennials (respondents aged 16-29) saw the email’s design as the most influential factor. As the age of the respondents rose, the importance placed on design dropped. Likewise, device compatibility was deemed less significant of a factor for older respondents than to those in the ‘millennial’ age bracket, with only 17.1 percent of respondents overall noting it as the most important element. The findings give further strength to Clemmie’s argument that personalisation is now an essential element to all marketing campaigns.

personalised email marketing

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